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Lidya Buzio - Ceramics 2012 Winter



 Lidya Buzio Ceramic Sculpture – Scapes & Abstractions

Opening Thursday November 15 through March 9, 2013

Catalogue with essay by Garth Clark, 148 pages

Carnegie Hall Voices from Latin America festival featured exhibition

Born in Montevideo, Uruguay, Lidya Buzio has worked in clay in New York since 1972, creating abstract volumes and cityscapes.  She produces works that are unique for the medium, a distinctive fusion of painting and sculpture made of terracotta.

The exhibition features her New York Cityscapes, with their evocative rooflines, water towers, and architectural details; and a new series of abstract geometric designs with glowing burnished surfaces in bright primary colors.

Buzio begins by cutting earthenware slabs into geometric shapes, and then combines cylinders, cones and hemispheres to form the sculpture.  She draws directly on the unfired clay and then paints with colors that she creates.  The works are then burnished, and when fired the painting fuses with the red clay body.

Garth Clark, ceramics most noted authority, wrote of his impression the first time he saw a Buzio piece, it was “of magical unity, form, color and material that are all one.  The imagery of downtown Manhattan hugged the vessel’s sensual curving shape and disappeared and reemerged from its volume, a constant kinetic shifting inwards and outwards.  It had a quality of being both ancient and contemporary at the same time.”

Buzio’s work is in the Painting & Sculpture Collection of the Brooklyn Museum & the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston; in the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; San Francisco Fine Arts Museums; the Nelson-Atkins, and Everson Museums; the Victoria & Albert, London; and other museums and private collections internationally.



Lidya Buzio

b. 1948, Montevideo, Uruguay -  d. 2014, Greenport, New York

A unique talent in the world of ceramics, Buzio learned to create, form, and shape clay sculptures from the master ceramicist José Collell, based on ancient Amerindian practices.  Buzio continued to work within this same method, cutting earthenware slabs into geometric shapes, and then combining these cylinders, cones, and hemispheres to form the body of her sculptures.  Using special pigments which she mixed herself, the artist drew and painted directly onto her unfired works.  Before firing, Buzio burnished her pieces; this step serves to fuse the paint into the clay and results in the unique luminosity and distinctive hues that characterize her artworks. 

After moving to New York in the early 70s', Buzio's pictorial vocabulary shifted to reflect her new urban surroundings, inspiring her to create her New York Cityscapes, with their evocative rooflines, cast iron architecture, and water towers.  Her last series of abstract geometric designs executed in bright primary colors, represented a new direction in her practice. 

Buzio's ceramics are found in the Brooklyn Museum New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the San Francisco Fine Arts Museums; the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; the Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York; the Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin; the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, Kansas; the Honolulu Academy of Art, Hawaii; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; the National Museum of History and the Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan.  Buzio’s work is also included in several other international museums and private collections.


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